Monday, 22 July 2013

Re: real smart

Well, call me a dumbass,  but I can't figure out what's going on in the picture!  Is this .gif supposed to be animated?  It could be that my PC is not working properly, (Alas,  my PC is now starting to seem dated, and needs more RAM.....I need to break down and buy a new one.....My laptop still works great, and I will save this message and look at it later tonight when I get into the house)

On Mon, Jul 22, 2013 at 4:27 PM, plainolamerican <plainolamerican@gmail.com> wrote:
I think it's perfectly ok to laugh at this guy and call him a dumbass.


On Monday, July 22, 2013 2:39:14 PM UTC-5, Travis wrote:




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Liberty Slipping: 10 Things You Could Do in 1975 That You Can't Do Now


Monday, July 22, 2013
Liberty Slipping: 10 Things You Could Do in 1975 That You Can't Do Now

In 1975:

1.You could buy an airline ticket and fly without ever showing an ID.

2.You could buy cough syrup without showing an ID.

3.You could buy and sell gold coins without showing an ID

4.You could buy a gun without showing an ID

5.You could pull as much cash out of your bank account without the bank filing a report with the government.

6.You could get a job without having to prove you were an American.

7.You could buy cigarettes without showing an ID

8.You could have a phone conversation without the government knowing who you called and who called you.

9. You could open a stock brokerage account without having to explain where the money came from.

10. You could open a Swiss bank account with ease. All Swiss banks were willing and happy to open accounts for Americans.

There are thousands of other examples .The differences in the business sector are even more prevalent. In recent years, in industry after industry regulations and prohibitions have been poured on top of free markets. It doesn't look like things will get any better in years to come. Eventually, the economy will suffocate and collapse, if this continues.

http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2013/07/liberty-slipping-10-things-you-could-do.html

New Yorker Cartoon: 911 is Busy, so Stand Your Ground


New Yorker Cartoon: 911 is Busy, so Stand Your Ground
By Jim on July 22, 2013

130722_daily-cartoon-thursday_p465 stand ground

Progress! Even New Yorker cartoonists now understand the imperative of people not relying on police to save their necks….

(Okay, maybe that is not the interpretation the magazine hoped for, but…)

A dozen years ago, I wrote a forward for a book entitled Dial 911 and Die, by Richard Stevens and Aaron Zelman. Here's my two cents:

Not every firearms regulation leads inexorably to genocide. But, as this sweeping historical study shows, supposedly "reasonable measures" such as licensing and registration of gun owners have been followed too many times in recent history by government atrocities. The issue is not the supposed good intention of reformers who seek to reduce private gun ownership: The issue is the nature of political power.

Aaron Zelman and Richard Stevens's book vividly reviews and analyzes the slaughter of disarmed populaces from the Turkish slaughter or the Armenians to Stalin's slaughter of the peasantry to the Guatemalan slaughter of Indians. The book goes in-depth into the bloodbath that was the Third Reich, as well as the Khmer Rouge urban renewal experiments, Mao's depredations, and other atrocities. The book also recounts the abuse that Blacks suffered in the United States after laws were passed them to disarm them – for the convenience of the Klan and other marauders.

Governments around the world have stripped hundreds of millions of people of their right to own weapons and then left them to be robbed, raped, and slaughtered.

Some people may try to dismiss Zelman and Stevens's distrust of politicians as unAmerican. But the distrust of politicians grabbing guns has a long and honorable history in this country. The American revolutionaries were concerned about the potential for unlimited power inherent in British laws and policies. The initial conflicts at Lexington and Concord occurred because British regiments were marching out to confiscate the colonists' arms caches. The British assumed that seizing the weapons would quell resistance to the expansion of their power. George Mason, the father of the Bill of Rights, later declared that the British decided that "to disarm the people . . . was the best and most effectual way to enslave them." If the colonists reasoned like some contemporary Americans, they would have interpreted the British troops' attempt to seize their guns as proof of how much they cared about the colonists.

Many proponents of restrictions on firearms ownership insist that the specific measure they champion can have little or no adverse impact on people's freedom. Americans of the Revolutionary Era recognized that the passage of a law does not signal the end of a political onslaught. Instead, it is merely the starting point for a push to further extend government in the same direction­to pursue the "logic" of a new act to its conclusion. As James Madison wrote in 1787, "The sober people of America . . . have seen that one legislative interference is but the first link of a long chain of repetitions, every subsequent interference being naturally produced by the effects of the preceding." Unfortunately, most contemporary Americans are complacent or naive about politicians planting their flag on new turf.

Politicians continually complain about "loopholes" in existing gun laws as a pretext to enact new gun laws. But the ultimate loophole is freedom: the principle that citizens should not be forced to be dependent on often lackadaisical government employees for their own safety and survival. Every restriction on citizens' rights to acquire and carry firearms means increasing citizens' subordination to government employees who are authorized to carry such weapons.

The primary effect of a prohibitions on private gun ownership is to vastly increase the power of politicians. But political tyranny has destroyed far more lives in the last century than have abusive private gun owners. Unfortunately, gun control advocates offer no solution to the problem of political tyranny – almost as if the problem will disappear if we all pretend government is our friend.

On gun control, we have to judge politicians as a class by their records, not by empty promises which can never be enforced after citizens have been disarmed. Gun control laws ultimately rest on the trustworthiness of the political ruling class. The only way that firearms could be less vital to defending freedom now than in the past is if politicians were no longer dangerous. But there is no trigger guard on political ambition.

http://jimbovard.com/blog/2013/07/22/new-yorker-cartoon-911-is-busy-so-stand-your-ground/

Strangling Hamas



 

Strangling Hamas

With Middle East peace talks coming and the Muslim Brotherhood on the rocks,

now's the time to bankrupt Gaza's Islamists.

BY JONATHAN SCHANZER | JULY 22, 2013

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/07/22/strangling_hamas_palestine_gaza_islamists?page=full

 

 

After six trips to the Middle East and tireless shuttle diplomacy, Secretary

of State John Kerry somehow convinced the Palestine Liberation Organization

(PLO) and Israel last week to agree upon "a basis" to hold peace talks.

Kerry has a long road ahead if he is to bridge the gap between the two

sides. He may not know it yet, but he has a secret weapon. He can help

cripple Hamas.

 

The PLO and the Israelis cannot agree on much, but their hatred for Hamas is

mutual. And the United States can leverage this by attacking the violent

Islamist faction while it is at the most vulnerable point it has been in

years.

 

The downfall of the Muslim Brotherhood government in Egypt earlier this

month has been widely described as a blow to Hamas and its de facto

government in the Gaza Strip. But the real damage has been to the Islamist

group's pocketbook. The Egyptian Army's ongoing operations against the

subterranean tunnels connecting Egypt to the Gaza Strip, which have long

served as key arteries for bulk cash smuggling, are wreaking havoc on

Hamas's finances. One senior Israeli security official told me that, in the

current environment, an additional reduction of 20 to 30 percent in Hamas'

revenues could "destroy" the movement.

 

Hamas's budget for running the Gaza Strip, which it violently took over in

2007, is estimated to be $890 million this year (Hamas doesn't submit to an

outside audit, so consider this a ballpark figure). Until last year, the

faction relied heavily on Iran and Syria for a great deal of its cash, but

the civil war in Syria prompted Hamas to loosen its ties to the "Axis of

Resistance." Funding from Tehran has dropped off precipitously since then,

forcing the faction to turn to the Muslim Brotherhood bloc to make ends

meet.

 

Qatar pledged $400 million to the group last year, when the emir visited

Gaza. Turkey is believed to provide additional support -- as much as $300

million, according to some estimates. However, it is unclear how much of

these funds are earmarked for the Hamas government bureaucracy, and how much

is slated for the building of mosques, hospitals, and other Gaza Strip

infrastructure that has been badly damaged during skirmishes with Israel

over the years. It is also unclear how much of this is funneled to Hamas'

military arm, the Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades. 

 

In addition to these funds, a whopping $1.4 billion per year reportedly

flows from the Palestinian Authority (PA) to Gaza. Hamas and the Fatah

movement fought a bloody civil war in 2007, but that has not stopped the PA

from earmarking these funds for the people of Gaza, whom they still purport

to rule. The PA has been careful not to provide any funds directly to Hamas,

for fear of invoking the ire of Congress. These funds primarily pay the

salaries of "civil servants" who lost their jobs after Hamas overran the

Gaza Strip. In essence, the PA pays these former bureaucrats not to work for

Hamas. The PA also directly subsidizes Gaza's electricity production and

reportedly underwrites other municipal services. Nevertheless, it is a fair

assumption that Hamas, which rules Gaza with an iron fist, pockets a portion

of the PA funds anyway.

 

Hamas has also augmented its income over the past decade by taxing goods

that come through the tunnels connecting the Gaza Strip to Egypt. The

tunnels were first created as a means to smuggle weapons to the coastal

enclave, but after Hamas conquered Gaza, prompting Israel to impose a

blockade, the tunnels became a key artery for a wide range of goods

necessary to keep the economy running. Hamas, as Gaza's de facto rulers,

reportedly took in at least $365 million a year from the tunnel trade.

 

But none of this matters much when Egypt's junta is engaged in a relentless

effort to shut down the tunnels. Specifically, the crackdown has made bulk

cash smuggling -- the key to Hamas's financial independence -- exceedingly

difficult.

 

The reversal of fortune for Hamas is remarkable. During Egyptian President

Mohamed Morsy's year in office, Egypt was a key Hamas base of operations.

Senior Hamas figure Mousa Abu Marzouk was based in Cairo, and Hamas even

held a round of internal elections in the Egyptian capital. In addition, it

is widely believed that elements of the Brotherhood's financial network were

bankrolling Hamas, even as Egypt's economy cratered.

 

These activities did not please the Egyptian military -- and for good

reason. Last year, Gaza-based fighters attacked an Egyptian military outpost

near the border with the Gaza Strip, killing 16 soldiers. Mounting concern

that Hamas members might be sneaking in to Egypt with dangerous weapons led

to a crackdown on the tunnels.

 

Since Morsy's ouster, the military has been unleashed: It has arrested at

least 29 Brotherhood financiers, including at least one significant

contributor to Hamas's coffers, according to a senior Israeli security

official. It has also reportedly deployed 30,000 troops to the Sinai and

purportedly destroyed roughly 800 of the 1,000 tunnels connecting Egypt to

Gaza. Ala al-Rafati, the Hamas economy minister, recently told Reuters that

these operations cost Hamas $230 million -- about a tenth of Gaza's GDP.

 

All of this presents U.S. Secretary of State Kerry with a rare opportunity

to try to hasten the group's financial demise. And it is in his interest to

do so.  The group, after all, carried out suicide bombings against Israeli

civilian targets in the 1990s to torpedo the peace process. It's a fair bet

that Hamas will launch a new campaign of violence now that talks are ramping

back up.

 

What can Washington do, exactly?

 

For one, Congress and the administration could stop wringing its hands over

whether the toppling of Morsy was a coup and instead openly encourage

continued operations against the tunnels (while also holding the army to

account as it navigates complicated transition). Congress, which dishes out

some $500 million per year to the Palestinians, could also quietly work with

the Palestinian Authority to scale back the funds that flow to Gaza.

 

From there, the United States could attempt to use whatever leverage it has

to convince both Turkey and Qatar to cut back on their funding of Hamas.

Admittedly, Washington doesn't have much pull in Ankara and Doha these days

-- they have more sway with us -- but Congress could pull strings to speed

up delivery of or withhold the advanced weapons systems that both countries

are eagerly awaiting, depending upon how the conversation goes. Turkey, for

example, is expecting Sidewinder missiles and Chinook helicopters, and it

would like to purchase Predator and Reaper drones. Qatar, for its part, is

expecting delivery of Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM)

Systems, and 500 Javelin-Guided Missiles.

 

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, a strident proponent of Hamas

on the world stage, is unlikely to be swayed. Erdogan insists that Hamas

must be part of the political equation when negotiating peace with Israel.

Qatar, however, presents possibilities. The former emir, Sheikh Hamad bin

Jassim bin Jabor al-Thani, recently abdicated the throne for his son, Tamim.

The new emir is still learning his way on the world stage, and it is

possible, some analysts suggest, that he could be persuaded to adopt new

policies that promote moderation in the Middle East.

 

While the math is fuzzy, one thing is clear -- the Egyptian army's tunnel

operations are slowly strangling Hamas. If one or more of the Islamist

movement's other funders cut back their aid even a little, its financial

crisis will only deepen. The more acute the crisis, the more Gazans will

grow frustrated with their Islamist rulers. A Muslim Brotherhood government

just fell unexpectedly in Cairo -- if Hamas doesn't watch its back, it could

happen again in Gaza.

 

For John Kerry and his tenuous peace initiative, this is a window of

opportunity that should not be ignored.

 

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Fourth Amendment "Flasher" Wins Over TSA in Victory For Civil Rights






http://www.policymic.com/articles/55951/fourth-amendment-flasher-wins-over-tsa-in-victory-for-civil-rights

 

Fourth Amendment Flasher Wins Over TSA in Victory For Civil Rights

Fourth Amendment Flasher Wins Over TSA in Victory For Civil Rights

Aaron Tobey (aka the Fourth Amendment Flasher,) who was unlawfully detained for stripping to his undergarments during TSA security procedures in 2010, has won his battle for infringements on his civil liberties through a court settlement.

Tobey bypassed his option for a full-body scanner and opted for a pat-down where he unclothed himself and revealed the Fourth Amendment quote "The right of the people to be secure against unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated." He was questioned for 90 minutes on his knowledge of or participation in terrorist activities that might have influenced this behavior, and was arrested by Richmond, Virginia police, who charged him with a misdemeanor.

Sporadic as they are, individuals such as Tobey who appropriately exercise their Constitutional rights are important in keeping under-trained and over-reactive government officials in check of their authority. In this case, Tobey applied his right to silently dissent on the TSA's search methods through the scrawling on his chest but it startled enough of the men-in-blue to land him in an unlawful interrogation.

While the TSA is charged with keeping passengers safe (and I believe in its right to do so), Tobey, who was almost naked, demonstrated no aggression and posed no visible threat to TSA officers or passengers.

What then is the real reason for Tobey's detention? The answer rests in a collective paranoia and ignorance that results in over-reaction. As such, the agreement for additional training of these officers at Richmond Airport serves a more meaningful purpose for government agents and civilians alike. Better education, better training and greater awareness of our civilian rights might just make for a more cooperative, respectful, and constitutional system altogether.

Click here for more information on those who have successfully and unsuccessfully challenged the TSA.

 



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The Democrats: The Lynch Mob Party [Video]





Sard posted: "The Democrats are the party of the lynch mob (see KKK). And yet it appears nothing has changed for the Democrat Party. 'Protesters' beat on a car, beat a grandmother and wouldn't let a local family take their child to a hospital. The protesters sma"

New post on therightplanet.com

The Democrats: The Lynch Mob Party [Video]

by Sard

The Democrats are the party of the lynch mob (see KKK). And yet it appears nothing has changed for the Democrat Party. 'Protesters' beat on a car, beat a grandmother and wouldn't let a local family take their child to a hospital. The protesters smacked the grandmother in the car as she was trying to […]

Read more of this post

Sard | July 22, 2013 at 5:29 pm | Tags: Al Sharpton, Barack Hussein Obama, Democrats, Eric Holder, George Zimmerman, Jesse Jackson, Justice Dept, Lynch Mob, Mobocracy, Race Pimps, Trayvon Martin, Violence | Categories: ACORN, American Culture, American Sovereignty, Bill of Rights, Calumny, Christianity, Communications, Communism, Conservatism, Crime, Cultural Marxism, elitism, Fascism, First Amendment, Founders, GOP, House of Representatives, In Memoriam, Indoctrination, Legal/Judicial, Liberal Crap, Libertarianism, Main-Stream Media, Marxism, Mob Action, National Security, Obama Lies, Planned Parenthood, Plantation Liberalism, Politics, Prejudice, Presidential Campaign, Progressive Movement, Racism, Sacrifice, Second Amendment, Self Defense, Senate, Social Engineering, Social Justice, Socialism, Tea Party, Terrorism, Totalitarianism, Tyranny, U.S. Constitution, Unemployment, Union Actions | URL: http://wp.me/p1SHGG-aiV

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Re: Worshipping the Wrong Goddess

 the statue in New York Harbor represents Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom
---
but does not represent an open door to America or democracy.

On Monday, July 22, 2013 9:09:26 AM UTC-5, MJ wrote:

JULY 22, 2013
Worshipping the Wrong Goddess
Democracy and Liberty Don't Necessarily Go Together
by B.K. MARCUS

The crowd in Tiananmen Square was losing hope. Their mass protest had drawn throngs of students at first, but as the summer of 1989 approached, their numbers were dwindling, their leaders were resigning, and the square itself, according to one historian of China's democracy movement, "had degenerated into a shantytown, strewn with litter and permeated by the stench of garbage and overflowing portable toilets."
 
The democracy movement seemed to be dying, not with a bang, but with a whimper.
 
This was before most of us in the West had ever heard of Tiananmen Square. What turned the protest around? Why did hundreds of thousands of supporters pack the square in the final days of May? What made the government, which had been ignoring the protest and refusing to offer any reforms, suddenly sit up and take notice­and send in tanks?
 
A lady with a torch.
 
To American eyes, she looked like a Chinese version of the Statue of Liberty, her torch of freedom held aloft over Tiananmen's huddled masses. The art students who had quickly assembled the foam statue over a bamboo scaffolding  had deliberately avoided creating something that seemed "too openly pro-American" -- even basing the style on the Cold War art of the Soviet socialist realists -- but even with her Chinese features and a two-handed grip on the torch, the comparison with Lady Liberty was unavoidable.
 
But while the statue in New York Harbor represents Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, the protestors in Tiananmen Square were worshipping a different deity. They called their statue the Goddess of Democracy.

The tanks rolled in and crushed the goddess beneath their treads, but her symbolic power remains, and her likeness now appears in the form of commemorative statues throughout the world.

The authoritarian state may have won the battle, but the war for freedom lasts longer than our history textbooks would have us believe. In England and America, we had more than a century of struggles between liberty and power before anything like a victory could be declared for our cause. It took more than a piece of paper­more than the Declaration of Independence or the Treaty of Paris. And for years the words and symbols of liberty and independence inspired generations of freedom fighters, not just the ones we call the Founding Fathers.
 
But did the symbols ever unite us? Americans may look at the unifying force of the Goddess of Democracy and long for a time when our own symbols had the power to inspire our passion and our courage, but colonial America was never united on the cause of independence. About a fifth of the white population was loyal to the British Crown, with twice as many keeping their heads down and avoiding any openly held position on the question of independence. That puts the American Revolutionaries in the minority. And even among those who actively supported America's secession from the empire, there was a deep philosophical divide about the goals of such a fight.
 
We call the American Revolution the War of Independence, but whose independence are we referring to? For the rank and file of the resistance, independence would mean freedom from coercive government -- independence for themselves, individually. For the elite, it meant putting themselves in charge in place of their former imperial masters: an American government independent of the British Empire.

A similar equivocation was at work in China's democracy movement. Another name for Tiananmen's Goddess of Democracy, one that wasn't used as widely, was the Goddess of Liberty. But democracy and liberty are hardly the same thing. The words are too often used interchangeably in the modern West, too, but we know that a democratic majority can impose horrendous violations on the outvoted minority. It was, after all, the democratic process that first brought Hitler to power in Germany.

Some try to avoid the problem with a qualifier: they advocate "liberal democracy," by which they mean a system with the constitutional protection of certain rights. But what virtues are captured by the term liberal democracy that aren't more clearly given in the single word liberty?
 
Did the Chinese want what we have here in the United States? Our political process produced the USA PATRIOT Act. The recent PRISM scandal may have uncovered illiberal, illegal, and perhaps even anti-democratic activities on the part of the NSA, but it was the legal political process of the world's leading liberal democracy that created the NSA, gave them a huge clandestine budget, and put them beyond the reach of public oversight.
 
Even if democracy worked according to the ideals we were taught in middle-school civics -- even if the qualifying modifier in "liberal democracy" were accurate (according to the older, now less-well-understood meaning of the word "liberal") -- I find it hard to believe that the passions and courage on display 24 summers ago in Tiananmen Square were about the mechanics of voting. Those people wanted freedom.
 
And yet I also recall American news coverage after the government tanks rolled in. In their post mortem of the movement, analysts explained that the Chinese students had no real experience of democracy and didn't understand what they were fighting for. Many within the movement, for example, conflated democracy with consensus, paralyzing all decision-making until they could achieve unanimity on everything.

I don't think the movement would have succeeded with a different name for the uniting symbol constructed in the square. Tank treads would have pulverized a Goddess of Liberty as effectively as they turned the Goddess of Democracy to rubble. But I do wonder about the effects that that unifying symbol has on the hearts of the Chinese masses, still yearning to be free.
 
Under the nominal Communists, the Chinese people are now discovering the blessings of markets and widespread wealth. Do they understand the relevance of the Goddess of Liberty? When they finally throw off the yoke of the totalitarian state, will they vote themselves into submission? I almost hope they maintain their confusion about democracy and consensus. A paralyzed government might allow liberty to flourish a while longer.

http://www.fee.org/the_freeman/detail/worshipping-the-wrong-goddess#ixzz2ZmcW3N11

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Re: U.S. Lawmakers & Diplomats Urge Surrender to Iran, But Supreme Leader Says U.S. Cannot be Trusted

Supreme Leader Says U.S. Cannot be Trusted

---
some don't forget.


On Monday, July 22, 2013 3:45:30 PM UTC-5, Travis wrote:




http://cnsnews.com/news/article/us-lawmakers-urge-opening-iran-supreme-leader-says-us-cannot-be-trusted

 

U.S. Lawmakers Urge Opening to Iran, But Supreme Leader Says U.S. Cannot be Trusted

July 22, 2013 - 4:20 AM


By Patrick Goodenough

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iran

Iranian president-elect Hasan Rouhani, center, listens with other senior officials as supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei addresses an iftar gathering on Sunday, July 21, 2013. (Photo: Office of the supreme leader)

(CNSNews.com) – As the Aug. 4 inauguration of Iran's "moderate" new president approaches, supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei warned him on Sunday night not to trust the United States and not to be optimistic about possible bilateral talks.

The ayatollah's advice to Hasan Rouhani comes at a time when a significant number of U.S. lawmakers are urging President Obama to cautiously explore possible openings with Iran's next president.

A letter signed by more than 130 members of the U.S. House from both parties acknowledged the presidency's limitations in the Iranian political system, previous disappointments as well as mixed signals on the nuclear issue from Rouhani himself.

But it argued that it would still be a mistake not to test whether his election "represents a real opportunity for progress toward a verifiable, enforceable agreement on Iran's nuclear program that ensures the country does not acquire a nuclear weapon."

Many hope that Rouhani's election last month may lead to an improvement in relations with the West after President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's often-turbulent two terms in office, but Tehran's foreign and nuclear policy is controlled by the supreme leader. Khamenei, now 74, has held the post through three eight-year presidencies and is expected to remain at the helm until his death.

Addressing a Ramadan end-of-fasting iftar with senior officials including Rouhani and Ahmadinejad, Khamenei told them that "the Americans are untrustworthy, they are illogical, and they are not frank in their interactions."

"Stands adopted by U.S. officials during the recent few months, too, once again confirmed the necessity of being pessimist about them," the official IRNA news agency quoted him as telling his audience.

Khamenei repeated an earlier comment that he has not prohibited talks with the U.S. on certain topics, such as the situation in Iraq in past years. But IRNA reported that he also cautioned that, in its interaction with the outside world Iran "should not forget the conduct of our enemies."

And, in apparent reference to the ongoing international dispute over Iran's nuclear activities, Khamenei advised that "the art in interaction with the world is to continue your path without the other party being able to stop you. If interaction with the world causes retreat from the path, it is a loss."

"We've always believed and continue to believe in interaction with the world but the important point is to understand the other party and determine its goals and tactics, because we will be tripped up if we don't understand them correctly," he told the iftar gathering.

Iran insists that its nuclear activity – which it carried out in secret for almost two decades before dissidents exposed it in 2002 – is for peaceful energy and research purposes only.

The U.S. and other governments suspect it is developing a nuclear weapons capability under the cover of the civilian program, however, and Iran is targeted with an array of international sanctions. Numerous rounds of multilateral talks over several years have brought no breakthrough in the impasse.

The letter to Obama on engaging Tehran, co-authored by Reps. David Price (D-N.C.) and Charles Dent (R-Pa.), was couched in guarded language, and stressed that the signatories were strongly opposed to a nuclear-armed Iran.

But it also noted that Rouhani had promised "constructive interaction with the outside world" and urged the administration to test this by using "all diplomatic tools to reinvigorate ongoing nuclear talks."

The letter did not call directly for sanctions to be lifted or eased, but did say the U.S. should be careful not to carry out "actions that delegitimize the newly elected president and weaken his standing relative to hardliners within the regime."

It also said sanctions, both multilateral ones and those imposed directly by the U.S., "must be calibrated in such a way that they induce significant and verifiable concessions from Iran at the negotiating table in exchange for their potential relaxation."

Most of the 131 signatories are Democrats, but they were joined by a number of Republicans: Reps. John Campbell (Calif.), Howard Coble (N.C.), Tom Cole (Okla.), Charles Dent (Pa.), Sean Duffy (Wisc.), John Duncan (Tenn.), Mike Fitzpatrick (Pa.), Michael Grimm (N.Y.), Richard Hanna (N.Y.), Walter Jones (N.C.), Richard Nugent (Fla.), Thomas Petri (Wisc.), Jon Runyan (N.J.), Glenn Thompson (Pa.), Patrick Tiberi (Ohio) and Ed Whitfield (Ky.)

'Message of congratulation'

In another Iran-related initiative, former diplomats Thomas Pickering and William Luers, joined by Jim Walsh of the MIT Security Studies Program, called for a "new approach to Iran," saying in an article that Rouhani's election and changes in the Middle East offer the opportunity to shift attitudes and behavior both in Iran and the U.S. after "more than three decades of mutual mistrust."

"Pressure has helped get Iran to negotiate; but diplomatic negotiation cannot succeed unless each side gets some of what it needs and unless each side comes to believe that the other wants an agreement and is willing to comply with it," they said.

Pickering, Luers and Walsh said they were not calling for a preemptive suspension of sanctions, but argued that "the piling on of more coercive sanctions and ultimatums, particularly when there are new hopes for the diplomatic process to get underway, will undermine or even preclude the possibility of negotiating a nuclear deal."

To lay the groundwork, they advised steps including a private message of congratulation from Obama to Rouhani; and the expression of a willingness for Obama to meet with Rouhani, perhaps as soon as during the U.N. General Assembly session opening in New York in September.

 



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Re: How to Prepare for the Pending Race Riots

the Pending Race Riots
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races dont' exist.

how brown would a person have to be to shoot?

On Monday, July 22, 2013 10:34:00 AM UTC-5, Travis wrote:



http://clashdaily.com/2013/07/how-to-prepare-for-the-pending-race-riots-2/

 

How to Prepare for the Pending Race Riots

 

By Skip Coryell / 20 July 2013

skips

I've been struggling with this article for several days now. Primarily because I didn't want to write anything about Trayvon Martin or George Zimmerman or the racial tension we've been having lately. Nonetheless, I find myself compelled. I've never been one to ignore the elephant in the room, and to do so now would be inconsistent and dishonest on my part.

But I'm not going to talk about the guilt or innocence of George Zimmerman; I won't discuss whether or not Trayvon was a good kid or a juvenile delinquent. Instead, I want to discuss what's happening right now across the country and what people need to do to prepare for the onslaught, assuming they want to survive.

Now let me preface this by saying I'm speaking as much to black folks as I am to white people. Because, after all, most of the race riots played out in the past were done in black communities. It was black people burning down the homes and businesses of their fellow black neighbors. If you live in the inner city, you need to get prepared – and fast!

Just do a Google search on "racial tension" and take a look at the headlines.

  • America's Racial Time Bomb is Ticking
  • Long Beach Residents Warned About Friday Bash Mob
  • Jesse Jackson: "Inclination to Treat Florida as Apartheid State
  • Media Inciting Race Riots in America

As a personal defense instructor, here is my best advice:

1. Get out of the city!

If you live there – move! If you don't have to visit, then by all means stay away from places like LA, Chicago, New York City and other racially charged urban centers. There's an old saying among self-defense enthusiasts: "When the crap hits, don't stand in front of the fan!" I live in rural Michigan and I seldom visit Detroit or Chicago. I just won't go there. Unless I absolutely have to, it makes zero sense for me to visit a high-crime area. So if you live in one of these places then please consider moving to a rural setting. If you have friends in the country or own a cottage, now might be a good time to go on vacation.

2. Buy a gun!

If you can legally possess a firearm, then by all means get one. For in your home a pump shotgun works pretty good. You've got a minimum of five rounds of double-ought buckshot, and that will put most overweight crackheads flat on their butts. If you're expecting a riot, then my weapon of choice would be an AR15 with several loaded thirty-round magazines. (Of course, an AK47 is good as always.) For home defense away from home you'll be needing a reliable pistol. I recommend the highest caliber you can accurately control. No one ever came out of a gunfight saying, "Oh man, I sure wish I'd had smaller bullets!" In the event of mass rioting, you may have to shoot several dozen people to stop the threat, so don't forget spare ammo. (Because no one ever went into a gunfight saying "Oh, man, I sure wish I had fewer bullets.")

3. Get firearms training!

Okay, so you've got a gun. Unfortunately, owning a gun doesn't make you a gunfighter any more than owning a guitar makes you a rock star. You should get the best training you can afford. Start with an NRA gun safety class, but don't stop there. There are some great national schools if you can afford them. Massad Ayoob Group, Rob Pincus and his ICE training, Front Sight for the basics, or maybe Dave Spaulding and his Handgun Combative's class. If all you can afford is a book, then check out:

  • Combat Focus Shooting by Rob Pincus
  • Combat Shooting with Massad Ayoob
  • REAL Secrets of Home and Personal Defense by Matt Canovi
  • The Cornered Cat: A Women's Guide to Concealed Carry by Kathy Jackson

4. Get a concealed carry permit!

Unless you're a wall flower who never leaves your house and has your Cheetos and Mountain Dew delivered to your front door, this is a must. Most people spend the majority of their time at work or school or out on the town. Are you just going to forfeit your ability to defend yourself unless you're in your home? Well, if you live in Chicago or New York or California, I guess you have no choice. But then again, that gives credence to my first advice "Get out of the city!" Go ahead and move to Texas. Why not? Everyone else is. I have to admit it's crossed my mind a time or two.

5. Buy self-defense insurance!

Most people wouldn't think of this one, but you can bet if George Zimmerman didn't have it before, he has it now. Anyone who carries a gun for self-defense and wants to protect his or her assets as well as their freedom has a policy like this. There are many out there, so you just need to shop around. I hold two such policies:

I'm very happy with both services. They offer legal grants, legal referrals, expert witnesses as well as educational opportunities before and after a deadly force altercation has occurred.

While I was writing this article, my wife walked up behind me and started to read over my shoulder. (I hate when she does that.) And of course she had to criticize by saying my first point wasn't valid because most people can't afford to move out of the city. That doesn't matter and the point is still valid and probably the most healthy piece of advice I can give you. This is a very bad time in American history to live in a large city. When the crap hits the fan, major American cities are ground zero.

 



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